species of the week #59 – bog orchid

The bog orchid is the most delicate and smallest native orchid, and the only one that can cope with the inhospitable site conditions of the raised bogs. In Rhineland-Palatinate it grows in only three locations. Distributionstatus Threatened with extinction, only three sites left Remaing deposits Near Dahn in palatiante forrest and Deuselbach in Hunsrück Last […]

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species of the week # 58 – ornate bluet

The only breeding water known in Rhineland-Palatinate at present is located in the Bruchbach-Otterbachniederung in the Southern Palatinate. Here the species occurs in large populations. Distribution status Threatened with extinction Remaining deposits Bienwald Last sightning in Rhineland-Palatinate current Habitat Sunny, clean streams and ditches in grassland Threat Mown banks and embankments, overfertilisation, drought As a […]

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species of the week #57 – Damon blue

Damon blue reach a wingspan of 34 to 38 millimetres and are hard to confuse in Germany because of the large white, dagger-shaped stripe that appears on the otherwise grey-brown underside of the hindwings. The upper wings of the males are shiny turquoise. The wings of females are dark brown with a fine white margin. […]

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species of the week #56 – chess flower

The chess flower is also known as the checkerboard flower or peewit egg. Its name quickly becomes apparent when you see its flowers: They show a chequerboard-like pattern, usually in a darker and a lighter shade of purple. However, there is also a white checkerboard flower in which the typical pattern is still clearly visible […]

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species of the week #55 – griffon vulture

In 2014, a griffon vulture was observed for several days in the Grünstadt area. With a wingspan of up to 2.70 m, griffon vultures are significantly larger than buzzards and therefore very conspicuous. Only eagles are almost as large, but show a completely different flight pattern. Griffon vultures are nest feeders and are cared for […]

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species of the week # 54 -migratory locust

The migratory locus is one of the largest short-feathered grasshoppers in Central Europe. The individuals can be green, brown or gray in color. The transparent forewings are nearly twice as long as the hind legs and dark spotted. Distribution status Extinct in Germany Remaining deposits Southern and Eastern Europe Letzte Sighting in Rhineland-Palatinate before 1941 […]

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species of the week #53 – marsh gladiolus

The marsh gladiolus gets its unusual german name “Siegwurz”- translateabel as “victory root” from the chainmail-like sheath of thick bevels that protects the plant tuber. It is said to make its owner invulnerable in battle – like Siegfried from the Saga of the Nibelungs. Distributionstatus  Threatened with extinction Remaining deposits  in the Speyerer Wald FFH […]

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species of the week #52 – marsh pug

The marsh pu, also called the dwarf flower moth, is a really small butterfly; it is just about the size of a european two-cent coin. Another special feature is its activity pattern: it is the only Central European flower moth that is diurnal. Distribution status  Extinct in Rhineland-Palatinate Remaining deposits Individuals in NRW in Lower […]

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species of the week #51 – european roller

The European Roller used to be a breeding bird in Germany. The last regular breeding occurrences in eastern Germany became extinct in the 1990s. Occasionally, the European Roller can be observed as a migrant in Germany. Verbreitungsstatus Distribution status Extinct in Rhineland-Palatinate Remaining occurrences Africa, Europe, Russia and Asia Last sighting in Rhineland-Palatinate 1994 near […]

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